Architecturally Stunning Saunas That Will Inspire You

Sauna in Ranco Lake, Chile

Around Ranco Lake in Chile, characterized by a stunning landscape and rather inclined slope covered in tall thin cypress trees, chilean practice panorama arquitectos debuted their oeuvre of work with a hillside sauna. anchored over a black granite rock, the natural timber structure contains a roofed terrace, sauna, and changing room clad on the interior with Alamo wood and on the exterior with oak due to its durability.

 

 

Grotto Sauna in Georgia Bay, Toronto 

Located within Georgia Bay, the site is a large-scale prehistoric rock formation. The contemplated research was carried out, and through the process, the Grotto was established as an inspiration, informing on the design. Grottoes, historically, have been known as natural or man-made caves that are embedded deep behind the curving streams, and therefore are discovered only by those who take the time to explore.

As a standalone sauna, the Grotto uses two blast heaters that ensure efficiency and control. There are vents and fans in place that allow the building to breathe seasonally and prevent rot or mold in the structure. The rest of the systems are based on controlled air flow. They used an insulating material of the building to protect not only its components from heating or cooling too fast, but also to make the grotto more energy efficient.

 

The Bands Kleivan Sauna in Norway

The Bands, Kleivan, Lofoten, Norway

The project is located on a quay in Kleivan, Vestvågøy, a former fishing village in Lofoten, Norway. It is part of a building complex that also contains three cottage buildings – a fishermen’s cottage, a cod liver oil production and a cod salting building.

Students of the scarcity and creativity studio from the oslo school of architecture and design were asked, ‘to improve the use of these protected buildings; by creating a melting point which will provide activity and social life to increase the use of the quay, and make it more pleasant for visitors, artist groups, locals and summer tourists.’ their answer comes in the form of ‘bands’, a multi-purpose facility that forms a sensitive relationship with the landscape and water.